Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act Passes in the U.S. House of Representatives.

On Wednesday, July 11, 2019, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2019 with a vote of 365 to 65. The Bill was introduced by Representative Zoe Lofgren, Representative Ken Buck and 112 other House sponsors and seeks to eliminate per-country numerical limitations for employment-based immigrants and to increase the per-country numerical limitation for family-sponsored immigrants from 7% to 15%.

Currently, the wait for an employment-based green card and a family-based green card for non-immediate family members depends on an individual’s country of birth. This has resulted in significant backlogs for countries with higher numbers of employment-based green card applicants, including India and China, and for countries with higher numbers of family-based green card applicants, including the Philippines and Mexico.

Proponents of the Bill believe that reducing the green card backlog will ensure that the U.S. continues to attract the world’s top talent and will allow close relatives of U.S. citizens from oversubscribed countries to emigrate to the U.S. a lot sooner.

Senator Rand Paul introduced the Backlog Elimination, Legal Immigration, and Employment Visa Enhancement (BELIEVE) Act on the same day that the House passed the Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act. Senator Paul’s proposal will, among other things, eliminate the per-country numerical limitations for employment-based immigrants, increase the number of employment-based green cards available each year, and grant spouses and children of E, H, and L visa holders work authorization. Senator Paul’s Act does not contain any family-based immigration provisions.

We will continue to monitor developments and share updates as more information becomes available.

USCIS has Updated Policy Manual in Regard to Services Provided to Public

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has updated its policy manual regarding services to the public, including general administration of certain immigration benefits, online tools and providing up-to-date information.

Notable updates include revisions to “case specific information,”  “expedited treatment” and “service request procedures.” The American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) has issued a 13-page response to the USCIS policy manual update.

In matters involving “case specific information,” the AILA takes issue with some field offices requiring mobile devices to be shut off. These mobile devices often allow access to case specific information. See excerpt from the AILA regarding this matter below.

“USCIS might consider a general policy requiring that all electronic devices be switched to “silent” or “vibrate” when inside a facility and further establish criteria for permissible use of such devices during interviews and appointments, such as accessing case specific information, conducting case related research, and responding to an urgent or emergency situation.” Sec. h paragraph 3.

USCIS currently has vague guidelines regarding “expedited treatment” matters. Section g. of AILA’s response would like USCIS to provide more specifics on scenarios where expedite requests will be granted. Not only would this provide clarity to applicants, but it would also cut down on requests, which in turn would save USCIS a lot of manpower in sifting through inordinate amounts of non-qualifying expedite requests.

In regard to matters involving “service request procedures,” the AILA document provides requests to improve and expedite services provided by USCIS.

Graham Adair will continue to provide updates if and when additional changes are made.