Categories Department of Labor Department of State News & Updates USCIS

Looming government shutdown’s anticipated impact on immigration

The Senate failed on Monday to pass a key procedural FY 2022 federal budget vote to advance the House-passed short-term government funding bill. If lawmakers fail to reach an agreement, U.S. government funding could expire and lead to a full federal government closure on 12:01 am on October 1, 2021.

What impact does this have on immigration processing? Each federal agency would have its own shutdown plan, which will coordinated by the Office of Management and Budget. However, based on prior shutdowns in previous years, the following should be expected:

Immigration operations that should remain in operation:

  • Customs and Border Protection (CBP): CBP is likely to continue processing immigration applications at the border and performing inspection functions.
  • Immigration and Customs Enforcement: ICE enforcement activities and operations of the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) should continue.
  • SAVE System (USCIS database used by government agencies such as state motor vehicle departments to verify an applicant’s immigration status when processing applications for benefits).

Immigration operations that will likely be suspended:

  • Department of Labor (DOL): As the DOL would likely be categorized as a non-essential function, DOL immigration functions will likely be suspended. No PERM applications, labor condition applications (LCAs), prevailing wage determinations (PWDs) or applications for temporary labor certification would be processed. The agency would not accept PERM applications or audit responses, LCAs or prevailing wage requests either online or by mail.
  • E-Verify: Employers should expect to be unable to initiate E-Verify queries or resolve tentative non-confirmations, and would not be expected to meet the usual E-Verify deadlines until the program is reauthorized. Please note, employers should not take any adverse action against any employee whose employment eligibility verification cannot be confirmed in E-Verify due to the shutdown. All employers will remain subject to Form I-9 obligations and deadlines as usual.
  • Conrad 30 Program

Immigration operations that will be potentially experience further processing delays:

  • U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS): The USCIS should continue to process applications but processing delays, already widespread, would continue or worsen. Appointments at USCIS local offices and Application Support Centers should not be affected by the shutdown, though COVID-19 precautions are still in place.
  • Department of State: Some passport offices may be affected if they are located in federal buildings that are closed due to the shutdown, but if not, should continue operations. Although the State Department’s visa processing and U.S. citizenship document functions are not expected to be suspended, they may be further affected by reduced staffing and other effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

We will continue to monitor the situation and provide updates as they become available. In the meantime, please contact your Graham Adair attorney with any questions.

Categories Department of State News & Updates

Biden Administration Lifts Ban on Immigrant Visa Processing

Earlier this week, the Biden Administration lifted a ban that was put in place last year on the processing of immigrant visas (green cards) at U.S. consulates. While lifting this ban is good news for many who are awaiting the processing of their immigrant visa, we anticipate that there will still be delays in processing cases because of backlogs and reduced consular staffing caused by the pandemic.

The President has left in place the ban on nonimmigrant visas, such and H-1Bs and L-1s, that is set to expire on March 31, 2021. There are some exceptions to this ban, and it does appear that the ban will not be extended and will expire as scheduled

Looking forward, we anticipate that there will be continued delays in getting visas from U.S. consulates while current pandemic restrictions are in place. However, the lifting of the ban on immigrant visas is good news for those who have been precluded from applying over the past several months. If you have questions about travel or your visa application, please contact your attorney at Graham Adair.

Categories Department of State News & Updates

Trump Extends Ban on Certain Immigration Applications

President Trump has extended Presidential Proclamations (P.P.) 10014 and 10052 through March 31, 2021. As previously reported, P.P. 10014 suspends the entry of immigrant visa applicants through consular processing.

P.P. 10052 suspends the entry of certain nonimmigrant visa applicants who have been deemed to present a risk to the US labor market during the economic recovery following the pandemic.  Specifically, this suspension applies to applicants for H-1B, H-2B, and L-1 visas; J-1 visa applicants participating in the intern, trainee, teacher, camp counselor, au pair, or summer work travel programs; and any spouses or children of covered applicants applying for H-4, L-2, or J-2 visas.

Please contact your Graham Adair attorney for case-specific advice.

Categories Department of State News & Updates USCIS Visa Bulletin

UPDATE: October Visa Bulletin Surge Coincides with Increased Fees

As an update to our news alert from yesterday, USCIS initially indicated that it would use the Final Action Dates chart as it normally does. However, later in the day USCIS updated its filing notice website to indicate that it would actually accept cases filed under the Dates for Filing chart.

 

This is significant because many categories surged forward from the Final Action Dates chart in September to the Dates for Filing Chart for October. For EB-3 India, this meant a move of approximately 5 years. EB-1 for China and India moved about 2.5 years.

 

This movement provides many additional applicants to file applications for Adjustment of Status in October. We anticipate that USCIS will receive an unusually high volume of cases within this short 30-day window. This will likely result in processing delays as USCIS assimilates these cases. Of particular consequence, this could mean significant delays in the issuance of cards for EAD work authorization and advance parole for travel.

 

We are in the process of contacting clients who are eligible to file in October. Please contact your Graham Adair attorney with any questions.

Categories Department of State News & Updates USCIS Visa Bulletin

October Visa Bulletin Surge Coincides with Increased Fees

This morning, the U.S. Department of State issued the October Visa Bulletin, which shows modest gains under the Final Action Dates chart. China saw the biggest movement in the EB-3 category, a move of 4.5 months. Similarly, India saw its biggest gain of 3 months in the EB-3 category. All other countries, including Mexico, Philippines, Vietnam, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras, which had retrogression in the EB-3 category, are now current.

 

The primary question is whether USCIS will direct applicants to use the Final Action Dates chart, as they normally do, or the Dates for Filing chart. If it’s the latter, then many additional priority dates will become current, especially in EB-3 for India, which moved more than 5 years from the September Visa Bulletin. EB-1 for China and India also saw significant movement of about 2.5 years. USCIS will advise on which chart to use no later than October 1, 2020.

 

This surge in dates coincides with a significant change in the fee structure for USCIS. The biggest change in the permanent residency process is the unbundling of fees for I-485 Adjustment of Status. Until the end of September, the I-485 filing fee is $1140, which includes applications for an EAD card for work and advance parole for travel. Starting October 1, 2020, USCIS will unbundle that I-485 fee and require additional fees for EAD cards and advance parole. The EAD application will require a $550 government fee, and the advance parole application fee will be $590.

 

If USCIS uses the Dates for Filing chart, there will be a massive surge in applications for Adjustment of Status, many of which will include the additional fees of $550 and $590 for EAD cards and advance parole, respectively. Considering that many thousands of new cases would be filed in a very short period of time, it’s possible future visa bulletins could retrogress many dates that were current under the October Visa Bulletin, which would create a scenario wherein applicants are required to pay those $550 and $590 fees annually to maintain their EAD cards and advance parole.

 

We are watching the visa bulletin closely and will send an announcement once USCIS indicates which chart will be used for permanent residence applications.

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